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To show that you are eligible for asylum, you must show that you suffered persecution in your home country in the past, or that you would face persecution there if you return. The meaning of “persecution” goes beyond just harassment, discrimination, minor injuries, and inconveniences. “Persecution” means extreme harm: Torture, sexual violence, and physical violence (especially multiple incidents), and lengthy ...

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Showing that you were the victim of persecution, or that you would face a threat of persecution in the future, isn’t enough to establish eligibility for asylum. You must also show that your persecutors were or would be motivated to harm you on account of your race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group.

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The US government has identified a number of countries that are experiencing conditions that would prevent nationals from safely returning. If you are from one of these countries, you may be eligible for a form of relief from removal called Temporary Protected Status (“TPS”).

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IMPORTANT: In most circumstances, you MUST file your asylum application within one year of your entry into the US. If you believe you may be eligible for asylum, and you have been in the country for less than one year, you should contact an experienced immigration attorney immediately to make sure that you meet the one-year deadline.

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If you have been placed in removal proceedings, you may be detained by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) until an immigration judge decides whether or not you should be removed from the US. However, ICE is only able to detain a small percentage of people who are in removal proceedings, and you will probably be allowed to remain free ...

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In June 2012, former President Obama adopted an executive policy allowing people who had unlawfully entered the US before turning sixteen years old to apply for a form of relief from removal called “deferred action.”

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It might be time to delete those drunk selfies, and not for the usual reasons. Following the far-reaching and controversial Executive Order signed by President Trump on Friday, White House Policy Director Stephen Miller has been in discussions with State Department and Customs and Border Protection officials about the possibility of “asking” foreign visitors to reveal all websites and social ...

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A legal separation (referred to as a Decree of Legal Separation by the courts) is a binding agreement, approved by the court, in which a married couple formalizes the division of their household. It makes provisions for almost all of the same aspects of a divorce – debts, assets, child custody and residential schedules, financial support, and so on – ...

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U.S. citizens and noncitizens alike know that convictions for drug possession often have very serious consequences. In recent years, however, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) and its related agencies have reduced or eliminated the immigration consequences for certain marijuana convictions.

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